Pharmacy Model For Medication Therapy Management Improves Patient Health, Instructs Students

Main Category: Pharmacy / Pharmacist

Article Date: 19 Oct 2011 – 1:00 PDT
email icon email to a friend   printer icon printer friendly   write icon opinions  

Current Article Ratings:



Patient / Public:not yet rated
Healthcare Prof:not yet rated



Student pharmacist Samuel Akinyele noticed on her chart that Maria’s blood sugar was too high. He suspected that her insulin dose was too low. Akinyele reviewed her medications with volunteer pharmacist Faramarz Zarfeshan, RPh, who brought a physician and other team members into a huddle.

Akinyele and other University of Maryland School of Pharmacy students at the Mercy Health Clinic in Gaithersburg, Md. are learning firsthand about the remarkable effectiveness of medication therapy management (MTM), a hot new pharmacy trend in interprofessional heath care.

Meanwhile, patients in the MTM program are getting better all the time, says Mercy’s medical director Nancy Ripp Clark. She says MTM provides some underserved patients with medication reviews while it provides experiential rotations for fourth year pharmacy students and pharmacy residents.

In 2009, the School of Pharmacy, ALFA Specialty Pharmacy of Columbia, Md., the Primary Care Coalition of Montgomery County, and the free, not-for-profit Mercy Health Clinic collaborated to provide MTM in an interprofessional model. At Mercy, patients with high risk, multiple medical conditions, and multiple medications are referred to MTM for medication reviews and management.

Results from clinical outcomes data analysis of patient health confirm team members’ observations of a resounding success for the model.

The model is also receiving national recognition. Most recently, the American Diabetes Association presented the MTM team with its Promising Practice Award of Excellence.

The team includes three pharmacists, two physicians, two nurses, two pharmacy residents, and three pharmacy students at a time, plus, when needed, language interpreters, nutritionists, and social case workers. In the first 18 months, 130 patients have been seen and more than 1,000 medications reviewed, averaging eight medications per patient.

In Maria’s case, the MTM team reached a collective decision to switch the 50-year-old Spanish- speaking patient to a different type of insulin that would better disseminate throughout her bloodstream and better suit her lifestyle. Maria’s problem might have lingered without the MTM teamwork approach and was perhaps partly due to her language barrier. She couldn’t explain that she is not able to medicate several times a day.

With MTM, pharmacists’ time with the patients is invaluable, says Mercy Health Director Clark. “Pharmacists provide in-depth health care and excellent teaching. As pharmacists they have given us insight into certain channels for ordering certain types of medications. They are very up to date on medication interactions and side effects,” Clark says.

Each pharmacy student sees five patients every Thursday. They review the patients’ medications, take their blood pressure and pulse, and discuss any side effects. “One of my patients today was taking meds from somewhere else, and I reviewed this with Dr. Zarfeshan,” says Akinyele.

According to Rosemary Botchway, MS, director for the Center for Medicine Access at the Primary Care Coalition (PCC) of Montgomery County, the program now offers free access to 38 generic drugs. Also pharmaceutical companies, through a program called Medbank, provide free brand name medications to people who cannot afford to buy their medicine. The PCC is a private, non-profit, charitable organization working with public/private partners to provide high-quality, accessible, equitable, efficient, and outcome-driven health care services for low-income, uninsured County residents.

“I am very excited to be part of the team here,” says the PCCMC’s community pharmacy coordinator, Tanya Dang. She analyzes the clinical outcomes data from patient charts and sends it to the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). “That helps tell our story at the national level.” The federal agency set up a national initiative of collaboration with a goal “to provide health care quality and outcomes through integration of evidence-based clinical pharmacy services within interprofessional health care teams,” states the HRSA web site.

Each month Dang participates in a conference call with HRSA. “The monthly conference makes me so happy to realize that the patients are definitely getting better,” she says. There are 128 HRSA-associated collaboratives nationwide. The MTM model is the only such collaborative in the state.

Clark and Botchway say the MTM teamwork provides a better review of patients’ medications because physician visits are typically short. The collaborative plans to expand to a similar clinic, the Proyecto Salud in Wheaton, Md., this fall.

The MTM model serves multiple purposes in education, says Heather Congdon, PharmD, CACP, CDE, assistant dean for the School of Pharmacy’s campus at the Universities at Shady Grove, where many of the students rotating at Mercy matriculated. “The education the students received here crosses health care lines. There is no limit to what can be learned in such a collaborative atmosphere.” She is also a provider at the MTM clinic and a certified diabetes educator. She provides diabetes education and monitoring for patients in the program who have diabetes.

“I am amazed by the dedication and leadership of the team and our collaborative partners, and thankful for this distinctive rotation opportunity for our Doctor of Pharmacy students who get to witness the power of collaboration and gain experience in real-world patient care to prepare for their practice as pharmacists,” says Hoai An Truong, PharmD, MPH, acting director of the School’s Experiential Learning Program, assistant professor of pharmaceutical health services research, and an MTM pharmacist.

“It’s a health care playground for education,” adds Zarfeshan, “both in patient relationships and data gathering. They work as a team and everything is done under the same roof.” He says the MTM model has “a huge potential for the pharmacy profession to impact the general health of the American population, while reducing national health care costs. Many patients go to multiple doctors of different practices. Here all of this can be channeled in a central location.”

Zarfeshan says that pharmacists “are in a great position to give the patient the right information. We have a vision to make a difference for the health care system.”

  • Additional
  • References
  • Citations
Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Source: University of Maryland Baltimore

Visit our pharmacy / pharmacist section for the latest news on this subject.

University of Maryland Baltimore

Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

University of Maryland Baltimore. “Pharmacy Model For Medication Therapy Management Improves Patient Health, Instructs Students.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 19 Oct. 2011. Web.
19 Oct. 2011. <http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/236189.php>


APA
University of Maryland Baltimore. (2011, October 19). “Pharmacy Model For Medication Therapy Management Improves Patient Health, Instructs Students.” Medical News Today. Retrieved from
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/236189.php.

Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


Rate this article:
(Hover over the stars then click to rate)
Patient / Public:
orHealth Professional:

Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our
Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our

Sharp Rise In Young Kids Accidentally Poisoned By Medication, US

Featured Article
Academic Journal

Main Category: Pediatrics / Children’s Health

Also Included In: Pharma Industry / Biotech Industry;  Pharmacy / Pharmacist

Article Date: 16 Sep 2011 – 11:00 PDT
email icon email to a friend   printer icon printer friendly   write icon opinions  

Current Article Ratings:



Patient / Public:not yet rated
Healthcare Prof:not yet rated



New research shows there has been a sharp rise in the US in recent years in the number of young children seen in emergency departments or admitted to hospital because of accidental pharmaceutical poisoning from taking a potentially toxic dose of medication. A report on the study, from Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, appeared online in the Journal of Pediatrics earlier today.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC, says that more than 70,000 emergency visits each year are due to unintentional overdoses among children under the age of 18.

The numbers are now so bad that the CDC set up the PROTECT Initiative, a collaboration of public health agencies, private sector companies, professional organizations, consumer/patient advocates and academic experts to to stop unintended medication overdose in children.

First author Dr Randall Bond, medical director of the Drug and Poison Information Center at Cincinnati Children’s, and also emergency medicine physician there, is presenting a report on the study at a PROTECT Initiative meeting in Atlanta on the 20th of September.

Bond told the media that every year, “more children are exposed, more are seen in emergency departments, more are admitted to hospitals, and more are harmed”. He said:

“The problem of pediatric medication poisoning is getting worse, not better.”

He and his study co-authors found that of the cases of accidental poisoning in young children in the US, exposure to prescription medications accounts for:

  • 55% of emergency visits,
  • 76% of admissions, and
  • 71% of significant harm.

Particularly high among the prescription medications most commonly swallowed accidentally by young children were opioids (frequently prescribed for pain), sedatives-hypnotics (mostly prescribed as sleep aids), and cardiovascular drugs.

Bond said efforts to prevent these accidental poisonings happening in the home are not working.

He and his colleagues found that the largest proportion of increased admissions, injuries and deaths in recent years has been been as a result of children finding and swallowing pills on their own, and errors in giving children medication at home are relatively uncommon and have increased little.

“We need to improve storage devices and child-resistant closures and perhaps require mechanical barriers, such as blister packs,” urged Bond.

“Our efforts can’t ignore society’s problem with opioid and sedative abuse or misuse,” he added.

For the study, Bond and colleagues examined patient records in the National Poison Data system covering the period 2001 to 2008. This electronic database records all calls made to centers that are members of the American Association of Poison Control Centers.

They reviewed over 450,000 records relating to children aged 5 and under, who were exposed to a potentially toxic dose of either prescription or over the counter pharmaceutical drugs.

Bond said the most likely reason for the sharp rise is because of the rise in medications that are around small children. This is supported by surveys that show more adults are taking more prescription medications today than ten years ago.

Written by Catharine Paddock PhD
Copyright: Medical News Today
Not to be reproduced without permission of Medical News Today

  • Additional
  • References
  • Citations
Visit our  pediatrics / children’s health section for the latest news on this subject.
“The Growing Impact of Pediatric Pharmaceutical Poisoning.” G. Randall Bond, Randall W. Woodward, Mona Ho; Journal of Pediatrics, Article in Press, published online 16 September 2011; Link to Abstract.

Source: Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center.
Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

APA
Catharine Paddock PhD (2011, September 16). Sharp Rise In Young Kids Accidentally Poisoned By Medication, US. Medical News Today. Retrieved September 16, 2011 from http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/234546.php


MLA

Catharine Paddock PhD. “Sharp Rise In Young Kids Accidentally Poisoned By Medication, US”. Medical News Today, September 16, 2011. Web. 16 Sep, 2011.


Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


Rate this article:
(Hover over the stars then click to rate)
Patient / Public:
orHealth Professional:

Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our
Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our

Adherence To Medication Supported By Integrated Health Care Delivery System And Electronic Health Records

Main Category: Compliance

Also Included In: IT / Internet / E-mail;  Pharmacy / Pharmacist

Article Date: 07 Sep 2011 – 0:00 PDT
email icon email to a friend   printer icon printer friendly   write icon opinions  

Current Article Ratings:



Patient / Public:not yet rated
Healthcare Prof:not yet rated



People who receive medical care in an integrated health care system with electronic health records linked to its own pharmacy more often collect their new prescriptions for diabetes, cholesterol and high blood pressure medications than do people who receive care in a non-integrated system, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published online in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

The study of 12,061 men and women in Kaiser Permanente Colorado with newly ordered medications for diabetes, blood pressure and cholesterol found that only 7 percent of the people did not get their new prescriptions for blood pressure medication filled, 11 percent failed to pick up new prescriptions for diabetes medication, and 13 percent failed to collect new prescriptions for cholesterol-reducing medication.

Previous research of patients in health systems that are not integrated found that primary non-adherence, when new prescriptions are not filled, to be as high as 22 percent. However, primary non-adherence research conducted in non-integrated systems likely overestimates the percentage of patients who do not have their prescriptions filled. This is because, in a non-integrated system, medication orders from one organization must be linked with pharmacy claims from a different organization. Pharmacy claims databases do not include information on patients who never pick up their first prescription, nor do they contain information on patients who paid cash for their prescription, researchers said.

In contrast, within an integrated health system such as Kaiser Permanente, medication orders can be directly linked to prescriptions filled within the same system, thus including information on patients who do not pick up their first prescription.

“Given that adherence to medications is directly associated with improved clinical outcomes, higher quality of life, and lower health care costs across many chronic conditions, it is important to examine why some people never start the medications their doctors prescribe,” said study lead author Marsha Raebel, PharmD, an investigator in pharmacotherapy with the Kaiser Permanente Colorado Institute for Health Research and with the University of Colorado School of Pharmacy.

“Having electronic health record medication order entry linked to pharmacy dispensing information makes it much easier for clinicians and researchers to identify patients who are not getting their new prescriptions filled,” she said. “The next step is to better understand what the barriers are to people picking up the medications their doctors have prescribed to help them manage diabetes and heart disease.”

This retrospective, observational study examined pharmacy dispensing records of 12,061 men and women whose average age was 59 for 18 months in 2007 and 2008 to see whether they picked up newly initiated medications for high blood pressure, diabetes and high cholesterol.

“This group of people has historically been ignored because prescriptions were written on a piece of paper. But now that we have electronic health records with electronic order entry, we can find out patients that did not pick up their first prescription for medications they need,” Raebel said. “Now we need to look at how we can reduce the number of people who do not get their medications.”

This study is part of ongoing research at Kaiser Permanente to understand and improve medication adherence:

  • A Kaiser Permanente study last month in the same journal found Kaiser Permanente Northern California patients who obtained new statin prescriptions via a mail-order pharmacy achieved better cholesterol control in the first 3-15 months following the initiation of therapy – compared to those patients who only obtained their statin prescription from their local Kaiser Permanente Northern California pharmacy.
  • A Kaiser Permanente study published last year in the American Journal of Managed Care found that patients with diabetes, high blood pressure or high cholesterol who ordered their medications by mail were more likely to take them as prescribed by their doctors than did patients who obtained them from a local pharmacy.

At Kaiser Permanente, members have 24/7 access to My Health Manager, the world’s most actively used personal health record. Members can access an online pharmacy and get pharmacy refills at kp.org using My Health Manager, which can be mailed to them free of shipping charges or made available for pick-up at any Kaiser Permanente pharmacy.

Other authors of the paper include: Jennifer L. Ellis, MBA, MSPH, Nikki M. Carroll, MS, Elizabeth A. Bayliss, MD, MSPH, Emily B. Schroeder, MD, PhD, Susan Shetterly, MS, Stan Xu, PhD, John F. Steiner, MD, MPH, of the Kaiser Permanente Institute for Health Research and the University of Colorado Schools of Pharmacy and Medicine; Brandy McGinnis, PharmD, of the Kaiser Permanente Colorado Department of Pharmacy and the University of Colorado School of Pharmacy.

  • Additional
  • References
  • Citations
Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release.

Visit our  compliance section for the latest news on this subject.

Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

APA
Kaiser Permanente (2011, September 7). Adherence To Medication Supported By Integrated Health Care Delivery System And Electronic Health Records. Medical News Today. Retrieved September 7, 2011 from http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/233926.php


MLA

Kaiser Permanente. “Adherence To Medication Supported By Integrated Health Care Delivery System And Electronic Health Records”. Medical News Today, September 7, 2011. Web. 7 Sep, 2011.


Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


Rate this article:
(Hover over the stars then click to rate)
Patient / Public:
orHealth Professional:

Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our
Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our

Deadly Medication? Scientists Shed Light On The Dark Secret Of Queen Hatshepsut’s Flacon

Pharmacy / Pharmacist News

Main Category: Pharmacy / Pharmacist
Article Date: 23 Aug 2011 – 0:00 PDT
email icon email to a friend   printer icon printer friendly   write icon opinions  

Current Article Ratings:

Patient / Public:not yet rated
Healthcare Prof:not yet rated

The corpus delicti is a plain flacon from among the possessions of Pharaoh Hatshepsut, who lived around 1450 B.C., which is on exhibit in the permanent collection of the Egyptian Museum of the University of Bonn. For three and a half millennia, the vessel may have held a deadly secret. This is what the Head of the collection, Michael Hoveler-Muller and Dr. Helmut Wiedenfeld from the university’s Pharmacology Institute just discovered. After two years of research it is now clear that the flacon did not hold a perfume; instead, it was a kind of skin care lotion or even medication for a monarch suffering from eczema. In addition, the pharmacologists found a strongly carcinogenic substance. Was Hatshepsut killed by her medicine?

When Michael Höveler-Müller became the curator of the Egyptian Museum of the University of Bonn in 2009, it occurred to him to examine the interior of the vessel that, according to an inscription, belonged to Pharaoh Hatshepsut. Its neck had been blocked with what was generally considered “dirt,” but Höveler-Müller suspected that it might also be the original clay stopper. So possibly, some of the original contents might still be inside. In Dr. Helmut Wiedenfeld from the Pharmacy Institute, he found just the right partner, to get to the bottom of this question and of the flacon.

At the Radiology Clinic of the Bonn Universitätsklinikum, the flacon was subjected to a CAT scan. Here, the Egyptologist’s suspicion was confirmed – not only was the closure intact, but the vessel also held residue of a dried-up liquid. In the summer of 2009, Professor Dr. Friedrich Bootz from the Klinik und Poliklinik für Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenheilkunde (laryngology, rhinology and otology) of the University of Bonn took samples, using an endoscope.

Too greasy for perfume

This allowed Dr. Wiedenfeld and his team to analyze the old substances for their ingredients. And it became obvious very quickly that what they had found was not dried-up perfume. The mix contained large amounts of palm oil and nutmeg apple oil. “I didn’t think anybody would put so much grease on her face,” said Dr. Wiedenfeld. “That would make her look as greasy as a plate of ribs.” Two additional components clued the pharmacologist in to the actual purpose of the mix, “We found a lot of unsaturated fatty acids that provide relief for people with skin diseases.” And this is where the Egyptologist was able to add another piece of the puzzle, “It is indeed known that there were cases of skin disease in Hatshepsut’s family.” Inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis have a largely genetic component.

And the third group of ingredients also points to the fact that this substance was not about providing a nice fragrance, but instead, for fighting a big itch – the pharmacologists found a lot of hydrocarbons derived from creosote and asphalt. To this day, creams containing creosote are used to treat chronic skin diseases. Due to the potentially carcinogenic effects of some of its ingredients, creosote has meanwhile been banned from cosmetics completely, and medications containing creosote are now prescription-only.

What the pharmacologists detected in Hatshepsut’s little bottle was in particular benzo(a)pyrene, a hazardous aromatic hydrocarbon consisting of several carbon rings. “Benzo(a)pyrene is one of the most dangerous carcinogenic substances we know,” explained Dr. Wiedenfeld. For example, the risk of contracting lung cancer from cigarette smoke results essentially from this substance.

Did the lotion cause the Pharaoh’s death from cancer?

Did Hatshepsut maybe poison herself without knowing it? “There is a lot that speaks for this hypothesis,” Dr. Wiedenfeld said. “If you imagine that the Queen had a chronic skin disease and that she found short-term improvement from the salve, she may have exposed herself to a great risk over the years.” The Egyptologist also thinks that this is very likely. “We have known for a long time that Hatshepsut had cancer and maybe even died from it,” said Michael Höveler-Müller. “We may now know the actual cause.”

But at this point, the Bonn scientists can only surmise how Hatshepsut obtained her lotion. “Egyptian physicians were general practitioners and good surgeons, but they were lousy internists,” explained Dr. Wiedenfeld. “It is quite possible that they owe their knowledge of certain medications to their contacts with Persia and India where the healing arts were very advanced even in Antiquity.”

Article Reference:
University of Bonn


Please rate this article:
(Hover over the stars
then click to rate)
Patient / Public:orHealth Professional:

Bookmark and Share

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.

twitter icon  Follow us on Twitter
news icon  Pharmacy / Pharmacist headlines
email icon  email to a friend
printer icon  printer friendly version
newsletter icon  weekly newsletter
star icon  personalize your news

back to top - icon  back to top


Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Back to topBack to front pageList of All Medical Articles

MediLexicon International Ltd Logo

Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions


MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, UK
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2011 All rights reserved.


Prescription Pain Medication Addiction Prevalent Among Chronic Pain Patients

Alcohol / Addiction / Illegal Drugs News

Main Category: Alcohol / Addiction / Illegal Drugs
Also Included In: Pain / Anesthetics;  Pharmacy / Pharmacist;  Psychology / Psychiatry
Article Date: 22 Jul 2011 – 1:00 PDT
email icon email to a friend   printer icon printer friendly   write icon opinions  

Current Article Ratings:

Patient / Public:not yet rated
Healthcare Prof:not yet rated

A new study by Geisinger Health System researchers finds a high prevalence of prescription pain medication addiction among chronic pain patients. In addition, researchers found that the American Psychiatric Association’s (APA) new definition of addiction, which was expected to reduce the number of people considered addicts who take these medicines, actually resulted in the same percentage of people meeting the criteria of addiction.

Published in the Journal of Addictive Diseases, the study found that 35 percent of patients undergoing long-term pain therapy with opioids like morphine, OxyContin, Percocet and Vicodin, meet the criteria for addiction.

“Most patients will not know if they carry the genetic risk factors for addiction,” said study lead Joseph Boscarino, senior investigator II, Geisinger Health System. “Improper or illegal use of prescription pain medication can become a lifelong problem with serious repercussions for users and their families.”

Boscarino added that “genetic predisposition to addiction further exacerbates the risks associated with misuse of prescription pain medication.”

Using electronic health records, a random sample of outpatients undergoing long-term opioid therapy for non-cancer pain was identified and 705 participants completed telephone interviews from August 2007 through November 2008.

When comparing the APA’s newly revised criteria for addiction with the old criteria, researchers were surprised to find the prevalence of and risk factors for addiction to be virtually the same. It was determined that different symptoms now qualify the same patients for inclusion who would have been excluded under the previous classification system.

The study states that pain medication addiction often happens in people under 65, with a history of opioid abuse, withdrawal symptoms and substance abuse treatment. Risk factors for severe pain medication addiction also include a history of anti-social personality disorder.

“Ultimately, we hope our research will aid the development of newer classes of medications that don’t negatively impact the brain and therefore avoid addiction entirely,” Boscarino said.

Researchers from New York University also contributed to the study.

Source: Geisinger Health System

View drug information on OxyContin.


Please rate this article:
(Hover over the stars
then click to rate)
Patient / Public:orHealth Professional:

Bookmark and Share

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.

twitter icon  Follow us on Twitter
news icon  Alcohol / Addiction / Illegal Drugs headlines
email icon  email to a friend
printer icon  printer friendly version
newsletter icon  weekly newsletter
star icon  personalize your news

back to top - icon  back to top


Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Back to topBack to front pageList of All Medical Articles

MediLexicon International Ltd Logo

Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions


MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, UK
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2011 All rights reserved.


Calendar Blister Packaging Demonstrates Statistically Significant Improvement In Patient Medication Adherence

Main Category: Compliance
Also Included In: Pharma Industry / Biotech Industry
Article Date: 16 Jun 2011 – 9:00 PDT
email icon email to a friend   printer icon printer friendly   write icon opinions  

According to new data published in Clinical Therapeutics, the way a medication is packaged can have a significant impact on whether patients take it as prescribed. The study showed that Shellpak® calendar blister packaging from MeadWestvaco Corp. (NYSE: MWV) was associated with improvement in prescription adherence behavior in patients when compared with traditional pill vials. According to the researchers, a Shellpak-based adherence strategy could provide a substantial cumulative public health benefit when broadly implemented over a large population.

Poor adherence to medication is a growing issue across the country. The New England Healthcare Institute estimates the current cost of drug-related morbidity, including poor adherence, to be as much as $ 290 billion annually in avoidable medical spending, 13% of total U.S. healthcare spending. Research also shows that half of all patients in the U.S. do not take their medicines as prescribed, a dismal level of adherence which has held steady over the past three decades. Poor adherence leads to worsening of disease, serious and avoidable health risks, increased hospitalizations and even death. Within the study, the use of Shellpak, a proprietary calendarized 30-day, unit-of-use medication package demonstrated improvement in the adjusted estimates of refill persistence and adherence as measured by length of therapy and proportion of days covered with medication.

“We know there are many factors affecting medication adherence, and we know that the most successful solutions will involve multiple components,” said study co-author Lenn Murrelle, MSPH, PhD, and principal founder of Venebio, a life sciences research consultancy. “What’s exciting about this study is that medication packaging alone was found to have a positive effect on medication refill behavior. This says to us that packaging without any additional communications or instructions to either pharmacists or patients can play an important role in helping patients take their medication as directed.”

The retrospective analysis used pharmacy dispensing data from Walmart for 3.1 million individuals filling prescriptions for the generic cardiovascular medications lisinopril or enalapril, either alone or in combination with hydrochlorothiazide.

Results revealed the Shellpak refill persistence benefit was especially pronounced among certain subgroups.

- New medication users had an average length of therapy increase of 9 days over a year.
- Ongoing medication users had an average length of therapy increase of 5 days over a year.
- Persons taking fixed-dose combination formulations, or 2 medications in a single tablet experienced an average 17-day increase in length of therapy for new users and 12 days for ongoing medication users.

In addition, the study revealed that Shellpak users overall were more likely to reach “full refill adherence” – at least 80% of days covered with medication in a year – than vial users, with the greatest effect observed in new medication users. However, full refill adherence (PDC ≥ 80%) was more likely in Shellpak users regardless of their baseline level of adherence.

- PDC ≥ 80% was more likely reached by using Shellpak in those with the lowest level of baseline adherence, by 20% in new medication users and 23% in ongoing users.

- Individuals with a middle level of adherence at baseline had a 15% greater likelihood of reaching full adherence with Shellpak for new users and 8% for ongoing users.

- In the group with the highest level of baseline adherence, Shellpak users were 11% more likely to reach full adherence for new medication users and 5% for ongoing users.

“This publication is the first, large-scale pharmacoepidemiologic analysis of medication packaging, and the results are exciting and significant,” said Ted Lithgow, PhD, president and chief science officer, MWV Healthcare. “We believe smarter packaging serves a purpose beyond simply containing and protecting the physical integrity of a pharmaceutical, and this robust data provides compelling scientific evidence for Shellpak as a now-proven solution to help drive better patient adherence. We will continue to work with the medical, pharmacy and pharmaceutical communities, and regulators to consider these data and to further investigate the effects of packaging on medication adherence.”

About the Study

This was a two-year, retrospective cohort study of 325,361 new and ongoing users of the oral angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) lisinopril or enalapril – commonly prescribed for the treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure – designed to assess the real world effectiveness of a new calendar packaging technology on prescription refill adherence and persistence for daily, self-administered, long-term medication use. Eligible users comprised two packaging cohorts, Shellpak (282,605 lisinopril users (86.9%)) and vial (42,756 enalapril users (13.1%)), and ACEI user groups: 76.321 new users (23.5%) and 249,040 prevalent ongoing ACEI users (75.5%).

To assess the impact of Shellpak on refill behavior, measures of refill adherence and persistence in the baseline year before and follow-up year after the packaging switch were compared in the 325,361 adults aged 18-75 years who filled 30- or 90-day prescriptions in both the baseline and follow-up years. These individuals had adherence and persistence data available both before and after the packaging switch to Shellpak. Researchers used linear and logistic regression and propensity score matching to assess the impact of calendar blister packaging on refill adherence, using medication possession ratio (MPR) and proportion of days covered (PDC), and persistence using length of therapy (LOT).

The study was designed, conducted, analyzed and reported in accordance with the Good Research Comparative Effectiveness (GRACE) principles and Guidelines for Good Pharmacoepidemiology Practice. The Walmart pharmacy dispensing data were de-identified in accordance with HIPAA guidelines.

About Shellpak®

MeadWestvaco Healthcare’s Shellpak® is an innovative, award-winning package designed to improve medication adherence alone or in combination with other adherence strategies. Shellpak features a child-resistant and senior-friendly outer plastic shell that protects medication tablets packaged in a 30-day calendar blister card similar to packaging long used for birth control pills. The calendar feature helps patients track medication usage, helping reduce dosing errors such as overdosage and missed doses, and refill timing. The large, flat blistercard and package surface allows for dosing instructions and patient education to be printed in large, readable font. Shellpak can also be customized to reflect a brand image and provide differentiation for each medication enclosed.

Source:
MeadWestvaco Corporation


Please rate this article:
(Hover over the stars
then click to rate)
Patient / Public:orHealth Professional:

Bookmark and Share

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.

twitter icon  Follow us on Twitter
news icon  Compliance headlines
email icon  email to a friend
printer icon  printer friendly version
newsletter icon  weekly newsletter
star icon  personalize your news

back to top - icon  back to top


Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Back to topBack to front pageList of All Medical Articles

MediLexicon International Ltd Logo

Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions


MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, UK
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2011 All rights reserved.


Article Outlines Principles For A Conservative Approach To Prescribing Medication

Primary Care / General Practice News


Main Category: Primary Care / General Practice

Also Included In: Pharmacy / Pharmacist;  Pain / Anesthetics

Article Date: 13 Jun 2011 – 13:00 PDT
email icon email to a friend   printer icon printer friendly   write icon opinions  

Current Article Ratings:



Patient / Public:not yet rated
Healthcare Prof:not yet rated
Article Opinions: 1 posts



A shift toward more conservative medication-prescribing practices would serve patients better, according to a review article published Online First today by Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. The article is part of the journal’s Less Is More series.

As background, the article notes that the majority of patients under age 65 years receive at least one prescription drug annually. However, according to the authors, not every patient visit needs to result in a prescription. They point to “the recent spate of revelations of undisclosed and unexpected adverse effects of drugs in multiple therapeutic categories” as just one reason to take a more measured approach to medication usage.

Gordon D. Schiff, M.D., from Harvard Medical School, Boston, with colleagues in the medical and pharmacy divisions of the University of Illinois at Chicago, outlines a series of steps that can be taken to rein in prescription writing. “Although others have used labels such as healthy skepticism, more judicious, rational, careful, or cautious prescribing,” they write, “we believe that the term conservative prescribing conveys an approach that goes beyond the oft-repeated physician’s mantra, ‘first, do no harm.’” Among the steps they recommend for conservative prescribing:

  • Think beyond drugs. Would other interventions help? Would a medication simply mask symptoms without treating the problem? Can a condition be prevented instead of treated? Would waiting to see if the symptoms self-resolve be wise?
  • Practice more strategic prescribing. Do you have a solid understanding of medication choices? Is there a valid reason to switch to a new drug? Is it the right drug for your patient? Can you avoid using multiple medications?
  • Maintain heightened vigilance regarding adverse effects. Do you check with patients about potential drug reactions? Do you teach them the warning signs? Are the drugs you’re choosing prone to withdrawal symptoms or relapse?
  • Approach new drugs and new indications cautiously and skeptically. Where do you get your information about new treatments? Can you wait until a new drug has had a longer track record? Does the drug actually help resolve the core problem? Is it actually indicated for this problem? Does it deliver what it promises? Do studies tell the whole story on a drug?
  • Work with patients for a more deliberative shared agenda. Can you persuade patients not to demand drugs they have seen or heard advertised? Is a patient’s noncompliance with therapy the source of the problem? Has the patient already tried this drug without success? Can you encourage healthy skepticism in your patients?
  • Consider longer-term, broader effects. Would a different therapy be less likely to cause future harm? Can you find a way to make the prescribing system better?

“Individually, none of these principles is particularly novel, nor should any of them be terribly controversial,” write the authors. “But taken together, they represent a shift in prescribing paradigm from ‘newer and more is better’ to ‘fewer and more time tested is best.’” The authors recommend taking greater care when deciding to prescribe a drug, especially one that is new or not well understood. “While clinicians must always weigh the benefits of conservative prescribing against the risks of withholding potentially needed medications, at the very least we should seek to shift the burden of proof toward demanding a higher standard of evidence of benefit before exposing patients to the risks of drugs.”
(>Arch Intern Med. 2011;10.1001/archinternmed.2011.256.)

This work was supported in part by the Formulary Leveraged Improved Prescribing (FLIP) project, funded by the Attorney General Consumer and Prescriber Education Grant Program, and a Centers for Education and Research (CERT) grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

Commentary: Conservative Prescribing of Opioids

An accompanying editorial suggests that, whenever reasonably possible, physicians scale back the use of opioids for treating pain. The piece, authored by Deborah Grady, M.D., M.P.H., and Seth Berkowitz, M.D., both from the University of California, San Francisco, and Mitchell Katz, M.D., from the Los Angeles Department of Health Services, is also part of theLess Is More series.

As background, the authors note that opioids are the most commonly prescribed drugs in the country, and that up to one in five office visits ends in a prescription for these medications. “This situation would be acceptable if the benefits of opioid treatment outweighed the risks,” remark the authors. However, they say, the drugs do not always deliver substantial pain relief, and carry a high risk of addiction, side effects and death.

To reduce the reliance on opioids, the authors promote many of the same principles discussed by Schiff and colleagues. They advise pursuing nonpharmacologic treatments, starting therapy with trusted over-the-counter and nonopioid prescription drugs and referring patients to pain specialists as needed. Lastly, they point to the need to communicate effectively with patients. “The desire to relieve the pain and illness of others is the reason many of us went to medical school,” they acknowledge. “However painful it is to explain to patients who are experiencing chronic pain that we do not have effective and safe treatments for their pain, we should be willing to do so when appropriate.”

(Arch Intern Med. 2011;doi:10.1001/archinternmed.2011.213.)

Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

Source:
C. Myron
JAMA/Archives


Please rate this article:
(Hover over the stars
then click to rate)
Patient / Public:
orHealth Professional:



Bookmark and Share

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.

twitter icon  Follow us on Twitter
news icon  Primary Care / General Practice headlines
email icon  email to a friend
printer icon  printer friendly version
newsletter icon  weekly newsletter
star icon  personalize your news

back to top - icon  back to top


posted by Judith on 13 Jun 2011 at 2:01 pm

Every medicine has its own set of advantages as well as disadvantages. Any two people might not necessarily react to the same sort of medication in the same way. Thus even if you friend is relieved by oxycontin does not mean that it will suit you. You therefore need to consult with your physician before actually taking the medication. Other than this you also need to specify your habit and past ailments to your physician. This is important because many medicines react to habits like smoking and drinking. For example oxycontin, dilaudid, Percocet, tramadol and others should not be taken if you are addicted to alcohol. They react severely with alcohol. You must be very very careful and even make sure that your food and drinks do not contain any traces of alcohol. One should not take these medications even if they are suffering or have suffered from any of the given problems.

Judith
FindRxonline

| post followup | alert a moderator |




Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:



Back to topBack to front pageList of All Medical Articles


MediLexicon International Ltd Logo


Privacy Policy |

Bexhill-on-Sea, UK
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2011 All rights reserved.


Survey: Most Aussies Buy Prescription Medication More Than 12 Times A Year, Australia

Pharma Industry / Biotech Industry News

Main Category: Pharma Industry / Biotech Industry
Article Date: 30 May 2011 – 1:00 PDT
email icon email to a friend   printer icon printer friendly   write icon opinions  

An independent consumer survey today revealed the length to which Australians rely on prescription medication, with 52% of respondents buying or refilling the products more than 12 times a year.

“We were surprised by the high level of prescription medication use shown by the survey. Interestingly, we saw males were more likely (52%) to buy or refill their prescriptions more than 12 times a year than females (48%),” said CANSTAR CANNEX’s Head of Research Steve Mickenbecker.

“Not surprisingly, baby boomer respondents were the generation most likely to use prescription medication at this level (64%). However, a significant percentage of the younger generations were also frequent users of prescription medication, with 35% of Generation Y respondents and 39% of Generation X respondents buying or refilling prescription medication more than 12 times a year.”

This follows a study released recently by Pfizer which showed less than a third of people adopt other healthy habits when taking prescription medication to manage their health condition.

Endeavour College of Health Director of Education Nick Vardaxis said too many Australians depend soley on medication to solve their health issues.

“Prescription medication has a strong place in the health equation, but Australians should also consider how much diet and exercise can help alleviate, and sometimes cure, their symptoms,” said Dr Vardaxis.

The Canstar Blue survey showed 1 in 10 Australians surveyed have experienced an adverse reaction to prescription medication in the past 12 months.

“This is a significant health issue, with an estimated 200,000 hospital admissions in Australia each year attributed to prescription medication,” said Mr Mickenbecker.

The results showed 13% of Australians surveyed buy a portion of their pharmacy products online. Generation Y respondents were significantly more likely (19%) to buy online than those from any other generation.

A tiny 3% of respondents buy all their pharmacy products online.

The independent Canstar Blue consumer satisfaction survey also revealed pharmacy brand Chemmart beat its competitors by coming out on top with most satisfied customers.

Customers scored Chemmart top marks for the categories of overall satisfaction, service, range, availability of pharmacists and advice provided. Chemist Warehouse was voted top by its customers for price.

Most Common Pharmacy Gripes

- Pharmacy cluttered inside with excessive shelving and product ranges.
- Impersonal service and uninformed staff.
- Lack of privacy to discuss medical conditions and ailments.
- Long waiting times to speak with the pharmacist and for prescriptions to be prepared.

Canstar Blue, a new initiative of CANSTAR CANNEX, commissions Colmar Brunton to survey 2,500 Australian consumers across a range of categories every few months to measure and track customer satisfaction. Chemmart today received the Most Satisfied Customers Award for Pharmacies.

The outcomes reported are the results from pharmacy customers within the survey group. To qualify, the customer has to have purchased from the pharmacy within the last 12 months.

“We launched Canstar Blue to give Australians a free online resource to help them with their key purchasing decisions by making it simple for them to learn from the experiences of other consumers. It is essentially a guide to product excellence as voted by customers,” Mr Mickenbecker said.

The independent survey was undertaken in conjunction with professional market researchers, Colmar Brunton.

What are the Canstar Blue ratings?

Canstar Blue researches, compares and rates the suite of products according to customer satisfaction across categories including banking, domestic airlines, telecommunications, cars, electronic retailers and plasma and LCD TVs. Results are freely available to consumers who are encouraged to use the ratings as a guide to product excellence. The use of similar ratings logos also builds consumer recognition of quality products across all categories.

Source:
Canstar Blue

Please rate this article:
(Hover over the stars
then click to rate)
Patient / Public:orHealth Professional:

Bookmark and Share

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.

twitter icon  Follow us on Twitter
news icon  Pharma Industry / Biotech Industry headlines
email icon  email to a friend
printer icon  printer friendly version
newsletter icon  weekly newsletter
star icon  personalize your news

back to top - icon  back to top


Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Back to topBack to front pageList of All Medical Articles

MediLexicon International Ltd Logo

Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions


MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, UK
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2011 All rights reserved.


Amylin, Lilly, Boehringer Bicker Over Diabetes Medication Sales Force

Pharma Industry / Biotech Industry News

Editor’s Choice
Main Category: Pharma Industry / Biotech Industry
Also Included In: Diabetes
Article Date: 26 May 2011 – 10:00 PDT
email icon email to a friend   printer icon printer friendly   write icon opinions  

A Southern California Court has placed a restraining order against Eli Lilly on behalf of Amylin Pharmaceuticals, disallowing the pharma giant to use the same sales force to sell both Byetta (exenatide) and competing Tradjenta (linagliptin) made by Boehringer Ingelheim. Lilly must keep all information about the joint partnership with Amylin confidential to sales reps.

Byetta is an injectable prescription medicine that may improve blood sugar (glucose) control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus, when used with a diet and exercise program.

Byetta is not insulin and should not be taken instead of insulin. Byetta is not recommended to be taken with insulin. Byetta is not for people with type 1 diabetes or people with diabetic ketoacidosis.

In 2002, Amylin entered an alliance with Lilly for the global development and commercialization of exenatide, a medicine indicated as a first line treatment for type 2 diabetes.

Amylin’s lawsuit accuses Indianapolis based Lilly of breaking terms of their deal by forming a similar development and marketing agreement with Germany based Boehringer Ingelheim GmbH to sell a drug that will compete with Byetta. The competing drug was approved for sale this month by U.S. regulators. Lilly and Boehringer formed their agreement in January.

Amylin stated:

“We are disappointed that we could not resolve this matter amicably and that we were forced to bring legal action to protect our rights, our products, and our shareholders. Notwithstanding this litigation, we intend to continue to collaborate with Lilly in the development and commercialization of exenatide products.”

Amylin said it plans to continue working with Lilly, but it wants to keep Lilly from using the same sales force to sell both Byetta and Tradjenta.

Amylin entered into an alliance with Lilly in 2002 for the global commercialization and development of the drug, which is marketed as type 2 diabetes treatment Byetta. Amylin said it is seeking a preliminary and permanent injunction in its complaint. Amylin alleges that Lilly is engaging in improper, unlawful and anticompetitive behavior in the manner in which it plans to implement its recently announced global alliance with Boehringer Ingelheim to jointly develop and commercialize its linagliptin product, which will compete directly with exenatide.

The outcome Amylin seeks is to prevent Lilly from proceeding with its plans to use the same sales force to sell both competing drugs. One of the drugs covered under Lilly and BI’s type 2 diabetes drug partnership, signed in January, is the oral dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor linagliptin, which Amylin says will directly compete with exenatide products. Linagliptin is currently under regulatory review in the U.S., Europe, and Japan, and Amylin is seeking a preliminary and permanent injunction to stop Lilly using the same sales force to sell both exenatide and linagliptin.

Byetta is a medicine that helps treat people with type 2 diabetes in a different way than pills or insulin. Byetta may help persons get improved control of your type 2 diabetes by helping the body produce the right amount of insulin at the right time. And with Byetta, one may feel less hungry and eat less although it is not a weight loss product.

Sources: Byetta Online and Amylin News Release

Written by Sy Kraft

View drug information on Byetta.

Copyright: Medical News Today
Not to be reproduced without permission of Medical News Today

Please rate this article:
(Hover over the stars
then click to rate)
Patient / Public:orHealth Professional:

Bookmark and Share

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.

twitter icon  Follow us on Twitter
news icon  Pharma Industry / Biotech Industry headlines
email icon  email to a friend
printer icon  printer friendly version
newsletter icon  weekly newsletter
star icon  personalize your news

back to top - icon  back to top


Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Back to topBack to front pageList of All Medical Articles

MediLexicon International Ltd Logo

Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions


MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, UK
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2011 All rights reserved.


APhA Encourages Seniors To Connect With Their Pharmacist To Increase Wellness And Medication Knowledge

Main Category: Seniors / Aging
Also Included In: Pharmacy / Pharmacist
Article Date: 17 May 2011 – 1:00 PDT
email icon email to a friend   printer icon printer friendly   write icon opinions  

During Older Americans Month, the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) encourages America’s seniors to connect with their pharmacist to gain better knowledge of the medications they are taking and available wellness opportunities. As the most accessible health care provider and the medication experts, pharmacists are ready to discuss many of the issues that arise due to medications and age.

Thanks in part to advances in health care, education, technology and financial stability over the last several decades, seniors are living longer and are more committed to better standards of living, increased lifestyle choices and more involvement in decision making – from the community level to their personal health care. Your pharmacist can help sort out any confusion you may have about the medications you are taking, answer questions and assist in better decision making. This relationship can provide you with better control over your medications and can ultimately result in fewer side effects and interactions, resulting in a better quality of living. The pharmacist is also a great resource for care-givers and family members who may have questions about the medications a relative or person in their care may be taking.

Talk with your pharmacist today about the many ways they can help you understand your medications and improve your health and lifestyle. Some discussion topics may include:

- Understanding your medications, how to correctly take them, what they do and why you are taking them.

- Understanding brand vs. generic prescription medications, as well as over-the-counter (OTC) and herbal supplements and how they may interact with one another.

- Reading a label correctly, including warnings and dosing information.

- Determining whether an OTC medication or herbal supplement is the right choice, as side effects and interactions may increase with age.

- Over-coming loss of appetite, dry-mouth, sleeplessness or other dangerous age-related medication side-effects.

- Taking medication at the appropriate time throughout the day for your schedule and that medication’s known side-effects.

- Addressing problems with swallowing and pill size.

- Saving money at the pharmacy, including opportunities through patient assistance programs.

- Reviewing your total medication history, called a “medication check-up,” including all prescription and OTC medications, as well as herbal supplements. This will help determine if you are on the correct medication(s) for your condition(s), if any of your medications are interacting or whether there is a better medication for your schedule or with fewer side effects.

- Providing many of the vaccinations you may need and were not aware of.

- Various screenings including blood pressure, cholesterol, blood glucose and osteoporosis.

- Motivational counseling for a healthy lifestyle, including smoking cessation and managing disease.

Pharmacists work as a team with doctors and other health care providers to optimize care, improve medication use and to prevent disease. To achieve the best outcomes for their condition, patients should maintain regular visits with all of their health care providers. APhA encourages consumers to fill all their prescriptions with one pharmacy, get to know their pharmacist on a first name basis, carry an up-date medication and vaccination list and share all medical information with each of their health care providers.

Source:
American Pharmacists Association

Please rate this article:
(Hover over the stars
then click to rate)
Patient / Public:orHealth Professional:

Bookmark and Share

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.

twitter icon  Follow us on Twitter
news icon  Seniors / Aging headlines
email icon  email to a friend
printer icon  printer friendly version
newsletter icon  weekly newsletter
star icon  personalize your news

back to top - icon  back to top


Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Back to topBack to front pageList of All Medical Articles

MediLexicon International Ltd Logo

Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions


MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, UK
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2011 All rights reserved.